Dedicated to Deposits: Deals, Data, and Discussion

4.00% Money Market Account Guaranteed Through 2008 at a GA/NC/SC/AL Bank (Woodlands)

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Woodlands Bank is offering 4.00% APY on its Money Market Maximum Account for balances over $50,000 guaranteed until December 31, 2008. The yield for balances between $25K and $50K is 3.50% APY, and the yield for balances under $25K is 3% APY. These yields are also guaranteed through 2008. This offer is listed occasionally at the bank's front page. The bank is listing several different offers over the image of the trees. A different offer appears each time you reload the page. So if you don't see it at first, keep reloading. I also found this offer advertised in today's Savannah Now newspaper. The ad is available online here. Note, this ad shows only 3.25% for balances between $25K and $50K.

Here are some of the important details of this offer:
  • Requires a checking account. Their Free Checking seems to qualify
  • Money Market Account has a minimum deposit of $2,500
  • $10/mo fee if balance falls below $5,000
The bank also is listing other nice promotions on its front page such as a free gift for the checking account and some competitive CD rates: 4% APY 36-month, 3.75% APY 24-month, 3.65% APY 12-month and 3.50% APY 6-month. The minimum deposit is $500. This CD offer expires June 1, 2008.

New accounts appear to require a branch visit. Branches are located in Mobile, Alabama; Southport and Wilmington, North Carolina; Beaufort and Bluffton, South Carolina, and Pooler and Richmond Hill, Georgia. The bank has been FDIC insured since 1987 (FDIC Certificate # 32571).
  Tags: money market accounts, Alabama, South Carolina, Georgia, Woodlands Bank, North Carolina, CD rates, savings account

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Comments
2 comments.
Comment #1 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
WOW fantastic blowout deal. Need for a branch visit kills it, though, for me. Sure wish I could get into one of those branches. This is the deal I want, for sure.

1
Comment #2 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
I spoke to a branch supervisor, no way to open an account without a branch visit. Does anyone know why banks have this policy. I thought their objective was to take in money to loan at higher rates. What is wrong with my out of state money? Any thoughts?

1