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How to Fight Your Retirement Fears


How to Fight Your Retirement Fears

If you want to bring up a scary topic, it’s not what you might think – it’s retirement. Many Americans are freaking out about the future. In a new survey from Wells Fargo & Co., 40% of affluent (those with $100,000-$250,000 in investable assets) Americans say their biggest fear about retirement is that they “will do all the right things today and it still won't be enough for tomorrow” and 9% fear they “will have under saved and won’t recover.” If the glitter set is jittery, where does that leave the rest of us?

The last few months, survey after survey has revealed angst. Many people are saying they will delay retirement and work until at least 80. They are looking at 401ks and other retirement accounts and are wondering where in the world is the money going to come from to fuel the fun? There’s a certain gloom, “we’ll never make it” hanging in the retirement air.

But you know what they say about fear – it’s false evidence appearing real. For sure, some fears around retirement are based on a very harsh reality. But what gets lost in all the panic is that you are not powerless. If you step back, assess where you are right now on the road retirement and don’t like what you see, the journey is not over, rechart your course.

Here’s how to put your fears to rest.

Pay yourself first

You might think it’s selfish to consider yourself number one, but when it comes to money, pay yourself first. Quite simply, explains Kevin Kautzmann, a certified financial planner with EBNY Financial, -- treat yourself like a bill. All the other bills get paid; just make sure you do too. If you don’t make your savings a priority, you’ll fall short in your savings goal. Take advantage of the fact that the limit on 401k goes up in 2012 to $17,000. Don’t leave any employer matches on the table. Be ready to say no. Too many people are bailing out their children and grandchildren and putting their retirement at risk.

Invest wisely

Do not invest in highly volatile investments as volatility never ends well, cautions Jeff Sica, of Sica Wealth Management. Forget chasing market rallies. They are often short lived and result in ending up with stocks declining substantially. He also isn’t into bargain hunting when it comes to stocks because it’s difficult to determine what is a bargain and what is not in an overly volatile market like today. Keep your investment philosophy simple: consider your worst case scenario in making an investment. If that investment would permanently alter your lifestyle if it didn’t work out, don’t do it.

Develop a plan

Stop guessing. Many investors, even the wealthy are anxious in large part due to a lack of understanding of investment/planning basics. Executing a comprehensive retirement plan which illustrates potential outcomes based on varying assumptions regarding rates of return, inflation, and longevity for example, can go a long way in allaying investor fears. When going through this process, a lucky few will inevitably come to realize that even when very negative assumptions are made, they still have a very low likelihood of ever running out of money, says John Hauserman, president of RetirementQuest Wealth Management. Even if you don’t arrive at that rosy conclusion, you will at least reach a point in which you are able to focus on the real risks rather than being routinely overwhelmed by the non-stop barrage of financial negativity.

Focus on priorities

Distinguish the difference between your needs and your wants. Needs are expenses that would prove catastrophic should you fail to cover them, like your mortgage, rent, and utilities. Wants are the second home, gifting to children. Much of the dread people feel about retirement comes from the fear that they won’t be able to meet their needs. Building lower risk investment strategies designed to cover your basic needs can provide a high degree of comfort for retirees. However, if you have the appetite for risk, earmark those strategies for your “wants”. Failure to reach your wants does not embody the same tragic consequences.

Julie Murphy Casserly, a certified financial planner with JMC Wealth Management keeps it real: stop thinking about all the “should dos” for preparing for retirement and listen to your own intuition as to how your money has to be set up to serve you best. Visualize your ideal years in retirement and then align your money with that visualization.

To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom.



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45 Comments.
Comment #1 by 51hh posted on
51hh
Do everything/investing in an optimal manner (that is, do your best at any stage of the retirement planning) and, when the time comes, just retire.  Life is too short for worries/fears.  Just enjoy life!!

What is the "optimum" approach?  Do your own research and plan your own investment... it is your money.  Don't be copycats or herds.

When to retire?  When you reach 60s, when you go to your office everyday without any purpose and/or fun/excitement, and when your physical energy is not that high, you will know it is time.

After all, money is not the only thing in life. 

13
Comment #2 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
51hh: "Money is not the only thing in life" but I'd like to see you pay rent, buy food, or pay your bills without it.  As far as I know, our society is not 100% into bartering yet. As for retiring, that is a joke!  Since when do "we" get to decide on what age we will retire?  Companies know how to play the game better than we do.  They find reasons to get rid of workers even in their 50's so that they won't have to pay them full retirement benefits.  You want to work until 65?  Better get that application in at Walmarts!

12
Comment #3 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
 Many people are saying they will delay retirement and work until at least 80.

Are you serious? Try to find a job in your 50's...good luck. Ask me how I know.

 The only way to continue working when you get older is to work for yourself.

7
Comment #6 by scottj posted on
scottj
From what i have read from 51hh over the years here and on other sites I don't think he is on the government dole. I never thought about planning for retirement and having different accounts/investments for it. For me it was all about making and saving as much as possible and it all went into the same pot. Next thing I knew I had enough and did want to enjoy life more and retired at 48. Was nice of the Government to give me all almost $65k in unemplyment benefits while I "looked" for a new job. All I want from them now is my SS when I hit 62....oh and the big fat check they will give me every year when Obama care kicks in 

3
Comment #7 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
Scottj:   What big fat check is Obamacare going to give you?  If the Repubs get their man in, I think Obamacare will be "Obama NO Care".  Just curious.

3
Comment #8 by 51hh posted on
51hh
It is Christmas or at least holidays for us all.

Please express your opinion in a friendly manner.  No need for another Anon. warfare:D

Yeah, I think that I have made it to retire comfortably.  But it took consistency, prudence, and hard work.  And I can sing that "I did it my way."

For some Anon., your negativity/attack toward other posters is just going to ruin your own days and mood.  My deep sympathy for you.

Peace and happy holidays to all.

10
Comment #9 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
"Was nice of the Government to give me all almost $65k in unemplyment benefits while I "looked" for a new job".

 

That's really offensive stuff scottj.  I also "retired" young - took a modest corporate buy-out in 2004 at 47. My division got sucked into a monopoly,  went into the trash, and I let it ruin my health.  But I didn't take a penny in fake unemployment benefits. I get nauseus  when I hear about people scamming the unemployment insurance system. 

Now, 7 years later, I finally have a clean enough medical history to get decent private health insurance. Yeah "Obamacare" now forces the insurance vultures to cover my yearly wellness activities.  With my luck, going 7 years without decent healthcare will lead to a finding of some sort of male cancer.  Woo hoo, high fives to all the Republicans. 

10
Comment #10 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
$250k isn't affluent (i've got over 10x that I don't feel affluent), and it's ironic, if not comical, for this site to be giving out retirement advice given how it mostly draws people who only fear the stock market and expect to have a decent income from only bank interest.

5
Comment #11 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
scottj - If you "retired" voluntarily, as you imply, how did you manage to collect the $65K in retirement benefits without misrepresenting your retirement situation to the unemployment folks and/or us? 

4
Comment #13 by scottj posted on
scottj
"Scottj:   What big fat check is Obamacare going to give you?  If the Repubs get their man in, I think Obamacare will be "Obama NO Care".  Just curious."

Under Obamacare I will not have to pay more than 9.5% of income for Healtcare. So lets say I claim $80k in income, that would mean the most I would have to pay out of pocket is $7,600. My plan now is around $18k a year so would get a check back since it's a credit and not a deduction for $10,400. And it's great that while my income will not increase the Healthcare plan will so checks will get bigger every year. And about my recieving unemployment benefits, Government and deadbeat people have have put a big dent in my earnings by killing savings rates for people like us who have done everything right, so no guilt here. Was a life long Repulican but now rethinking that. If the Dems want to give me things who am I to argue, I mean so many people voted for this change

2
Comment #14 by scottj posted on
scottj
"scottj - If you "retired" voluntarily, as you imply, how did you manage to collect the $65K in retirement benefits without misrepresenting your retirement situation to the unemployment folks and/or us?"

My company was having a tough time in 2008 recession and getting low on operating cash. We went to our local SBA to get some money from the Federally backed loan program that was part of the stimulus plan. They gave us a list of banks that got money for it, all of them refused us. Company was in business for 40 years, had always been profitable and we had no debt. We all know now that the stimulus plan was a disaster and the money never got out. At that point I said **** it and allowed company to fail. Since I owned company I had to go through a review process and submit many documents, took about 2 months but in the end since I did take a weekly paycheck I was approved and ended up with the full 99 weeks. Not my fault no one wanted to hire someone who was not sure he even graduated high school and was a convicted felon. 

1
Comment #15 by Anon #11 (anonymous) posted on
Anon #11
scottj - Thanks for the additional perspective....would have done the same as you re the unemployment benefits if I had been in a similar situation.

Merry Christmas to you and all!

 

2
Comment #16 by scottj posted on
scottj
Also saw that when Obama got elected the class warfare would get worse, Now I'm no longer one of those evil capitalist 1%'ers. Now I pay almost no taxes and people like me better, what a system?

1
Comment #17 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
Goodness Scottj, why don't you write a book and let the rest of us know how to play the Obama game.  Sure would beat sweating every day looking for those needed CD rates!  Sounds like what you are doing is playing the system that the gov put in place.  Another 4 years of this and we won't have to worry about interest rates at all if you get my drift.

4
Comment #18 by Anonymous posted on
Anonymous
Soooo, Scottj lied when he said he "retired".  Upon further explanation, he didn't retire.  He was the owner of a "failed business".  Then went looking for someone to hire him.  Big difference.  What else are you lying about, Scottj?  Oh, and don't spend the big fat Obama care check you "plan" on getting before you actually receive it!

3
Comment #22 by scottj posted on
scottj
"Scottj sounds like a grifter.....confidence man.......scam artist."
I wish I was smart enough to be one of those. I just look at situation and find the best way to use it to my advantage 

2
Comment #24 by tightwad posted on
tightwad
Merry Christmas!

3
Comment #25 by nighttime (anonymous) posted on
nighttime
Folks, life is a balance. If you spend all your time worrying and denying life, what kind of life will you lead, and what good will the money do? Likewise, if you throw money to the wind and spend it on instant gratification, you won't have anything left for the "winter." Life is a balance. Know to be prudent, yet know when to treat yourself occasionally if you're able to. There are so many people in this world that do hard labor and get paid pennies for it, that will work for weeks or months to earn what you might earn in a couple days -- keep that in mind when you complain about your BMW's broken wiper blade. Consider if you had been born in another country or to another set of parents. Consider donating and doing a little good. Consider working hard. Consider saving for your future. Consider spending a little of it to live. Be thankful for what you have. And consider life is a balanace.

9
Comment #26 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

Dear Ms Nance-Nash,

 

Oh ... Its you again!

In general the tone of your writing is that you seem to claim some credible sounding source e.g. "EBNY Financial", "Wells Fargo & Co.", "RetirementQuest Wealth Management", "JMC Wealth Management" has said/written/indicated/surveyed "xyz ...", and then you go about making some argument/claim of your own based on it.

Don't you have something original?  Something that is your own?  Something where you are not cherry picking dubious claims from others, but are rather presenting irrefutable facts, and drawing logical lessons/conclusions?

Last time when we had the pleasure (?) of reading one of creations, it was a piece where you were ****ing some investment agenda.  Now we are not all that sure what it is that you are selling this time around?  Is is something as simple like "Make a plan to fight the fear". 

If that's all there is to it then does not sound all that new.  Does it?

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

.

2
Comment #27 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

Dear Ms Nance-Nash,

 

>> If the glitter set is jittery, where does that leave the rest of us?

 

Are you indicating that you lack $100,000-$250,000 in investable assets?  If yes, then I must disappoint you.  I possess well over 250k in investable assets.  I suspect that many readers here have more than 250k investable assets as well.  Therefore you are surely not one of us!

I'd urge you to erither not to count yourself among us, or to find a more suitable forum, where perhaps you might be at home.  Have you considered some "occupy" forums?

BTW, I'm not jittery.  When the insurance of FDIC for the CDs, when the insurance of the NCUA for the certificates, and the gurantee of the US Treasury for the i-Bonds is on my side, I do not find it necessary to feel even a little bit jittery.

truly yours,

Anonymous

.

1
Comment #28 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

Dear Ms Nance-Nash,

 

I must point out that you are contradicting yourself right in two consecutive sentances!

 

>> Stop guessing. Many investors, even the wealthy are anxious in large part due to a lack

>> of understanding of investment/planning basics. Executing a comprehensive retirement

>> plan which illustrates potential outcomes based on varying assumptions regarding rates

>> of return, inflation, and longevity for example, can go a long way in allaying investor fears.

 

First sentence urges readers not to guess, however the second sentence urges readers to make guesses!  Are you indicating that the there is no guesswork involved in determining the rate of return (for non-CDs investments), that there is no guesswork to determine inflation,  and that there is no guesswork involved to determine the longevity either?  Really?  Can you determine (say) inflation accurately without making some educated guess?

BTW may I inquire what are the assumptions?  Are they some educated guesses?

My guess is that this current article of yours, is as illogical as was your earlier one, or maybe it is more illogical, or maybe it is less illogical.  Are these varying assumptions sufficient demonstration that you are contradicting yourself in consecutive sentences?

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

1
Comment #29 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

Dear Ms Nance-Nash,

 

>> Julie Murphy Casserly, a certified financial planner with JMC Wealth Management keeps

>> it real: stop thinking about all the “should dos” for preparing for retirement and listen to

>> your own intuition as to how your money has to be set up to serve you best. Visualize your

>> ideal years in retirement and then align your money with that visualization.

 
Oh ... So do you now support that no plan is necessary?  Mere intution will suffice?  Simple visualization should do just fine, instead of detailed well thought out plan?

Sounds almost as if this certified financial planner is asking people to go by their gut and by their day-dreams?  And that should that equate to keeping it real.  Really?

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

1
Comment #30 by Karry2 posted on
Karry2
TO: scottj and all of the others who game the system.

First, you have narrow minded and selfish characteristics, that impact all of us, the normal US citizens.
I belive there are millions of your kind, who think that they are entitled to something free for life.
When such collective behavior is put together, we, the other side of your kind, suffer, because
you are creating un-sustainable society to live and prosper.

Your impact on the economy is tremendous in negative sense and your cost has been spread on the savers, tax payers and law abiding citizens.

You need to consider and decide on what kind of society you would like to live in.
When you imply the word Government, actually you are referring to me and millions of the other kind of citizens, who care and provide the means for your kind to survive on our backs.

Therefore, I feel you are indirectly stealing from me and others like me and I, “we” have right to directly address you and openly criticize you for impacting mine “our” lives in a negative sense and for making our economy to go down, for making us print money to cover your “entitled” rights to collect benefits, for making the value of the Dollar to go down and make all commodity prices to go up, for making our deficit to sky rocket and for making the value of my savings diminish in value

This “entitled” mentality you have (and millions like you) will destroy our economy and the whole society will change to a point of no return. You nay feel powerful and smart now, but one day you will realize how selfish and stupid your mental picture of America is.

I contribute to our Government and support its needs and I’m proud of what I do, but selfish “entitled” people like you, do not belong in our society called America.
 
Speaking about retirement, I would say: What retirement, the “entitled" people are enjoying my retirement money, so I don’t count on it anymore.

11
Comment #31 by scottj posted on
scottj
What entitlements did I get? Unemployment is not an entitlement, I paid into for over 30 years. Also since I owned the company I paid hundreds of thousands into it and up until  near the end I never laid off an employee. Over my working years I paid over a couple million in federal taxes, so I feel I have given my share and now can be like the almost 50% that pay none or very little taxes. And you are right that entitlements and Obama's socialist ways are going to destroy the Country but it seems thats what people wanted when they voted in change. So I decided to sit on the beach with a beer in my hand and just laugh at this mess.

2
Comment #32 by lou posted on
lou
Scott,

It is kind of laughable how people are judging you for taking advantage of the system. These are the rules, and I don't see any problem taking the benefits after paying in for all these years.

I am confused about your understanding of Obamacare. Having your premiums capped as a percentage of your income and receiving the difference between that and the cost of your insurance policy as a tax credit is not part of any healthcare plan I am aware of. Under Obamacare, if you are self-employed or in the individual market, you wil pay whatever the premium is and if you can't afford it (below a certain income level), the cost will be subsidized by the govt.. The plan will be a disaster for people like us (we will pay much more) and a boondoggle for people with little or no income. Trust me, there is nothing good for people like us with Obamacare.

2
Comment #33 by scottj posted on
scottj
Lou you can read about the subsides here https://a069-webapps7.nyc.gov/healthinslink/reform_SelfEmp.aspx   "Who is eligible for subsidies? Subsidies will be available to eligible individuals and families who purchase insurance in an Exchange and whose household incomes are between 133% and 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). In New York, most residents with household incomes below 133% FPL will be eligible for free or low-cost public health insurance. The FPL is set by the government each year; as an example, 400% of the poverty level is $43,560 for an individual and $89,400 for a family of four in 2011.


How will the subsidies work?


If you qualify for a premium subsidy, you will only be required to pay part of the plan’s premium. The federal government will pay the remaining portion. The amount of the subsidy you receive will be based on your household income and the plans available to you. In general, you will not be required to spend more than a certain percentage of your household income on coverage.

For example, if your family income is from 133% to 150% of the federal poverty level (FPL), the amount your family will pay in health insurance premiums will be limited to 3% to 4% of household income. The subsidies decrease and then stop as household income increases to 400% FPL. Those at the highest income levels eligible for subsidies, families with incomes from 300% to 400% FPL, will have to pay up to 9.5% of their income in premiums."   So since I don't work I can pretty much control the income level I'm at and with a family of 4 just need to stay under $90k. But I'm not sure if this will even happen, usually the Government has a way of ****ing me. In all honestly I hope it doesn't and the reason being Republicans take control again and get rid of the whole plan. Then I would probably even start up a new business   

2
Comment #34 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

 

Dear Karry2,




>> First, you have narrow minded and selfish characteristics, that impact all of us, the

>> normal US citizens. I belive there are millions of your kind, who think that they are

>> entitled to something free for life. When such collective behavior is put together,

>> we, the other side of your kind, suffer, because you are creating un-sustainable

>> society to live and prosper.

 

If you believe that there are millions of US Citizens who are narrow minded and selfish, then of course you are mplying that statistically significant population of the US is made-up of narrow  minded and selfish individuals. Since you used plural "millions" I must at least count 2 million in that category, and per US Census there are about 313 million of us in the US. Therefore, definitely per your belief, statistically significant number of population of the US ought to be narrow minded and selfish.  No?

Can you be a bit precise?  How many millions of "them" in your belief are narrow minded and selfish? ... Curious.

BTW, what is your belief about following the letter of the law that is made by the majority? If the majority is making lax laws/rules/regulations, which the so called selfish US Citizens 'game', then where in your belief the blame, if any, lies?  Would the blame go the law abiding US Citizens, or to the foolish, careless, lax US Citizens, who put in place such systems that are rather easy to game?

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

 

 

3
Comment #35 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

.

Dear Karry2,

 

>> I contribute to our Government and support its needs and I’m proud of

>> what I do, but selfish “entitled” people like you, do not belong in our

>> society called America.

 

Hmm ... you speak of contributing to the government and claim to be proud of it.  I do not buy it, for you seem to have trampled upon an individual's constitutional right.

Every living individual born on US soil very much belongs within our society.  There is no provision to revoke citizenship in our constitution of those individuals who are born here.  In fact every, so called "proud" US citizen, ought to respect, every other US Citizen who is following the letter of the law.

May I remind you that neither you, nor the US President, nor the US Supreme Court, wield any authority to tell a fellow US Citizen that they do not belong in our society.


truly yours,

Anonymous

3
Comment #36 by Shorebreak posted on
Shorebreak
Retired and comfortable at 62 with "NO FEAR"!:

Own my home outright, no car payment and no credit card debt. I receive a military pension for 20 years of service defending this country and am about to receive the earned benefits of Social Security. I've consevatively saved 20 percent of my income for the past 22 years and have enough financial assets, with the addition of a small inheritance, to survive for the coming twenty to thirty years of life, if I'm lucky not to succumb to some tragic disease. I live well on $35,000 per year, in a nice neighborhood with great neighbors, and travel when I desire. Hint: Have a long-term care insurance policy in place. It's cheaper when you take one out in your mid-50s.

 

2
Comment #37 by Karry2 posted on
Karry2
To Guest123 - #35,

You said:

“”“May I remind you that neither you, nor the US President, nor the US Supreme Court, wield any authority to tell a fellow US Citizen that they do not belong in our society.”“”

Are you an anarchist?

Your thought imply that anything goes, including the white crime criminals and murderers
and someone who has stolen your money are allowed to roam free.
Is it true that if you are incarcerated you loose your civic rights or not?

It looks like you have grand look of our society as a unit and are discounting the individualism effect on all of us. It is contradictory to have strong believe as an individual, but to thing of our society is amalgamated as one unit is wrong.

I believe our prison system takes away your civic rights until you are reformed and apply to take them back. A prisoner can neither vote nor obtain Government documents nor can work
or travel at will, in other words they are stripped from our society as such and they
DO NOT BELONG IN OUR SOCIETY until certain time has lapsed and then conditionally accepted back among us.

8
Comment #38 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.




Dear Karry2,




You did not answer questions:

1)  How many millions of us in the US, in your belief are narrow minded and selfish?

2)  If the majority is making lax laws/rules/regulations, which the so called selfish US Citizens 'game', then where in your belief the blame, if any, lies?  Would the blame go the law abiding US Citizens, or to the foolish, careless, lax US Citizens, who put in place such systems that are rather easy to game?

 
Anyways, the people who, in your belief "game" the system obviously are following the letter of the law.  Therefore, any sort of incarceration for such law abiding citizens is out of question, and what follows is that any loss of civic rights is impossible.

BTW, here are your words "selfish entitled people like you, do not belong in our society called America."  The fact remains that the society called America is made-up of the US Citizens.  That includes the 99% and the 1%, the convicts and the free, the males and the females, the blacks the whites and the other colored people, the risk-takers and the risk-averse, the Jews, the Moslems, the Christians, the Mormons, the Hindus and the people who believe in other faiths and even theose who believe in no faith. 

Our society called America is all inclusive.

The facts reamins that loss of some civic rights does not equate to revocation of citizenship.  And fact reamains that neither you, nor the US President, nor the US Supreme Court and nor the US Congress wield any authority to tell a fellow US Citizen that they do not belong in our society called America.



truly yours,

Anonymous

 

2
Comment #39 by With_Karry2 posted on
With_Karry2
I am with Karry2.

Oh yes, with Karry2 all the way.


 
Narrow minded & selfish millions are definitely not part of our society called America.

Thousands in prison are also not part of our society.

 
Bernie Medoff? He is out.

Raj Rajrathnam? He is out.

Same goes for the pedophile Catholic Priests. They are not part of our society.  

What about the Priests who feed the hungery without first checking if they are illegals?  Well, what do you say Karry2?

 Let us move on to Gays, Lesbians, Transgenders.   Out out and out.

 What about those awaiting trials?  Sandusky?  Everybody knows he is guilty, so he is out.

Bradly Manning? He outed confidential cables.  He is not convicted yet, but he is out.

Luis Scotter Libby? He outed a CIA operative, but he was pardoned.  Well, what about him Karry2?  Does he belong in our society or not?

There are a few states in our great nation who have allowed their same **** citizens to get legally married.  What do you say Karry2 about removing those states from our society called America? Or shall we simply remove the same-**** legally married couples?

Well there are a few cases here where I am not decided if they belong in our society or not.  So help me out here Karry2.

Readers, don't let my indecision here fool ya.  I'm sure Karry2 will step in and set us all right.  I leave decisions about who belongs in our society called America in his capable hands!
 
Karry2 - you are my decider in chief! Above the president, congress, courts and of course well above the constitution!
 

  Thanks.

 

 

2
Comment #40 by Apache posted on
Apache
I do not feel it is wrong to accept "entitlements" which are deducted from one's paycheck (when we are lucky enough to have jobs) like Social Security or even Unemployment Benefits when needed.  If one is in distress like so many are these days and needs food stamps, Medicaid etc. that is what it is for.  I think we are getting confused about people who are truly in need and accept such help and others who can "game" the system to get out of working etc.  Frankly, I don't think most Americans want to be jobless or without medical insurance and have to rely on the government to support them.  However, there will always be those who prefere to rely on others.   One thing I do agree with is that if one is a US Citizen they do belong in our Society called America.  

3
Comment #41 by HanksMM posted on
HanksMM
I agree with Karry2, she or he makes sense more than anyone of the other commentators.

For all of you other geniuses , please define the duties of a US Citizens.

I also agree that there are millions of the so called entitled people that game the system all the time , from un-needed food stamps to unemployment benefits received while working under the table for cash, all the way to grants of all kinds. I know few of those people myself and can vouch for it.

My definition for US citizen duties (to name few) is:
Honesty
Integrity
Morality
Patriotism
To protect and honer the freedom at all costs.
Expose the corruption

For the rest of us that do not behave as true citizens, we are rotten from inside and live under the pretenses that, if we outsmart the Government, we will be accepted in the society as smart and will become national heros, after all we are still citizens under the definition from some of the posters who think that they are smarter than rest of us.

There are true citizens and there are phony citizens who are here just to use the system.

5
Comment #42 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
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Dear HanksMM,

Fourteenth Amendment has the following text that addresses who is a citizen.

The following shall be nationals and citizens of the United States at birth:

(a) a person born in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof;


Our constitution has no text to address who is a true citizen and who is a phony citizen.  So I'm afraid the words like true and phoney pre-pendened to the citizenship is figment of your imagination.  

When a legally iliterate person interprets the constitutution s/he would know immediately that there is no such thing as a "true citizen" and no such thing as a "phony citizen".  It is a just a citizen.  Nothing more nothing less.  

 

>> My definition for US citizen duties (to name few) is:
>> Honesty
>> Integrity
>> Morality
>> Patriotism
>> To protect and honer the freedom at all costs.
>> Expose the corruption
Sure. Our constitution gives you the right to define citizenship any way you choose for your personal purpose.  But that does not make it the law of the land.
Roughtly put it would mean that you are welcome to believe in whatever you choose to, but when your belief contradicts with the provisions in constitution, your belief becomes without merit, and illegal from the point of view of the law.

truly yours,

Anonymous

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Comment #43 by scottj posted on
scottj
By Hanks definition most of our elected Government are not true citizens, biggest bunch of crooks and morally bankrupt people going. 

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Comment #44 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
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.

 

Dear scottj,

 

IMO what HanksMM's definition may do is quite sinister.

His definition is creating two classes of citizenry. True and Phoney.  Such classes can find ways of morphing into classification like first-class citizenry and second-class citizenry.

So long as HanksMM is keeping his definition for his personal usage, it is fine, but when he begins imposing his definition, in contrast to what is present in the constitution, upon others, then it has potential of causing disintergation/fragmentation of our society called America.

Framers of the 14th perhaps wanted to have no such classes in our society, therefore they did not make up any provision for classes within our citizenry. 

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

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Comment #45 by Guest123 posted on
Guest123
.

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Dear HanksMM,

 

>> For all of you other geniuses , please define the duties of a US Citizens.

 

Only reference to the duty I could find in our constitution is that of Jury.  That's it.  Only constitutionally mandated duty a US Citizen has is that of serving as a Jury when called upon by our country's Judiciary.

The laundry list of duties you have given is again figment of your imagination.  Especially imaginaive duty of a US Citizen is to "Expose the corruption".  Bravo!

 

truly yours,

Anonymous

 

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Comment #46 by With_Karry2 posted on
With_Karry2
I'm with HanksMM,

Oh yes, all the way with HanksMM.



 YESSSS ...  Duty of a true citizen is Morality.


 Bill Clinton?  He's out.

Newt Gingrich?  No way Hose.  That Phony Citizen, does not deserve to be our president.


Tiger Woods?  Phony citizen.

Brad Pitt? Phony citizen.


Listen HanksMM, I have couple of ideas I got to float by you.  Tell me what do think?


First Idea:

Remember we conferred citizenship upon Mother Teresa?  How about we start conferring citizenship upon some select members of Taliban who were in their Vice Police?  When it gets bad in Afghanistan, they can stop by in Vegas, and start training Vegas Police. We have trainined Afghan enough, now it should be their turn to train us.

 Second Idea:

Rather than True Citizen and Phoney Citizen, how about we create some SAT like grading?  People who are most moral and expose most currption get True Citizen Grade 4, and we'll go from there. True Citizen Grade 3, True Citizen Grade 2, True Citizen Grade 1 etc.  How about we have some kind of National Citizens' Registry.  Or how about color coded "belts"?  True Citizen Black Belt, True Citizen Brown Belt, etc.


Let us know what you think.


Thanks.

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Comment #47 by Glick posted on
Glick
So, most of you are afraid of the HanksMM definition of duties for a true citizen.

I agree with his definition and think most of you (who game our system) are trying to justify your past present or future behavior according to the 14th amendment, however, we are the ones who create our society by our contribution to the system.

No justification can be drawn for ill or immoral behavior and the system we are creating is liquid and changes according to our personal definition of citizen’s duties and our point of view.

Most of you who think that a citizen can do what ever they want, are low life persons and mostly selfish and anti social. The society is conglomeration of good and evil behavior.
If we allow the evil to prevail, than that is the system we unintentionally created and allowed bad behavior to take roots.

Congress is good example of bad behavior, we elected same people over and over, fully knowing that most of them are corrupt and work against the interest of the people.

As you can see, most of us like a prosperous country, but if nobody likes to contribute to it, either morally or financially we will become irrelevant persons instead of real citizens.
The choice is ours, but what I see here on this blog, makes me believe that most of us are opportunistic users and not contributors to our society.

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Comment #48 by scottj posted on
scottj
If more people were like me this Country would be in great shape. I have never walked away from any debt, I actually do send in tax money every year and  spend over $100k a year on goods and services. 

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Comment #49 by Apache posted on
Apache
Goodness Scotti, you and I could be twins except for the amount of money you spend.  You sure must have a BIG family!  Just be grateful you have that 100K to be able to spend in these hard times.  Most people I know, even if they have dough, are afraid to spend it for fear of what may be around the corner.  You must be Bernanke's dream guy!   Glad you can live your life like you want these days.

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Comment #50 by AlecS posted on
AlecS
To scottj - #48, Tuesday, December 27, 2011 - 1:40 PM

You said:

“If more people were like me this Country would be in great shape. I have never walked away from any debt, I actually do send in tax money every year and  spend over $100k a year on goods and services. “

I believe you do contribute few dollars, so you won’t feel guilty when you suck back few thousands in benefits. Do you see yourself how proud you are when you game the system and even prouder when waiting to profit from obamacare.

That will not make our country great, but we will all fail as a nation.

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Comment #51 by scottj posted on
scottj
You Said: "I believe you do contribute few dollars, so you won’t feel guilty when you suck back few thousands in benefits. Do you see yourself how proud you are when you game the system and even prouder when waiting to profit from obamacare.

That will not make our country great, but we will all fail as a nation"
You people just aren't getting my point. Do I think 99 weeks of unemployment is good? No. But I did qualify for it so of course I took it. Do I think Obamacare is good? Nope. will I take advantage of the subsidies? Of course. I'm not gaming anything and just taking whats being offered like all other will. If you and others don't like it then look at the source and get rid of Socialist Obama or we will be Greece in a few years. And I do nothing to make me feel not guilty because I'm not, I just like nice things for me and my family and thankfully I can afford them

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Comment #52 by Apache posted on
Apache
A GOOD citizen is someone who can tell ME where I can find CDs worth 3%??  Did we forget what this forum is supposed to be about?  I guess we expect Ken to do ALL the work by himself!  Get with it and start sharing some CD info!!

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