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6 Everyday Food Items That Have Soared In Price

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 1:14 PM
This is one reason why many people think the government's CPI underestimates real inflation. This Consumerist article summarizes the price increase over the last 10 years of 6 common food items. The price increases range from 56% to 143%. Keep in mind that an average 5% annual inflation would cause the price to increase 63% over 10 years.
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Ken TuminKen Tumin5,441 posts since
Nov 29, 2009
Rep Points: 123,675
1. Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:30 PM
There is another way to cope with these soaring prices.  First of all, who pays almost $4.00 lb. for ground meat?  I make a meatloaf or spaghetti sauce which is fantastic with ground meat for just a bit over $2.00 lb.  Buy it on "sale" and store in your freezer!  I live in a small apartment and don't have my large seperate freezer any longer but I have a small one at the top of my fridge and it can hold a good bit of my sale items.  Even eggs go on sale so what is the big deal.  If it isn't on sale, I buy something which is.  There is a way to fight against these high prices.  It's called "look for sales".  Every store has sales to move merchandise and if you live in a real house with a seperate freezer, you don't have to suffer from these high prices.   
6
paoli2paoli21,140 posts since
Aug 10, 2011
Rep Points: 5,087
2. Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 5:57 PM
1
ShorebreakShorebreak2,367 posts since
Apr 6, 2010
Rep Points: 12,619
3. Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 8:24 PM
Shorebreak:  None of the 21 items has an impact on my life except the gasoline.  I haven't found a way to get it on sale or freeze it.  Seriously,  people don't have to let all those items make a dent in their budgets if they just make a bit of change in their lives so they can get what they want without paying those higher prices.  I refuse to let this government's bad decisions and the bad economy change what I can afford to buy.  Everything goes on sale and is at one store or the other so why pay the higher prices.  With computers we can scan stores in our area who have the items we want on sale at the price we want to pay.  It's one way of fighting back at what is happening now.
1
paoli2paoli21,140 posts since
Aug 10, 2011
Rep Points: 5,087
4. Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 9:01 PM
Paoli2: You remind me of my mother. She used to go to three supermarkets every week. At Foodtown, her coupons (yes, she was an avid coupon-clipper -- I don't know how she even kept track of all the coupons she had!) were doubled. As for everything else, she went to ShopRite and Pathmark, shopping strategically according to which had the better prices. In addition to the three supermarkets, she also bought most fresh produce at the Paterson, NJ farmer's market. We were a single-income family, and my father, working almost 60 hrs./wk., earned under $40K per year (and even that was in his peak earning years late in his career). Yet my parents paid a 30-year mortgage off in full after just three years, got new cars about every six years, took vacations every year, put two children through private colleges (and without financial aid), avoided debt altogether (except for the mortgage), and were financially comfortable in retirement, despite my father's pension paying only $411/mo. BEFORE taxes! I suppose I'm my mother's son: after graduating college at the age of 20, I put myself through graduate school for a Ph.D. and was independent of my parents since, paid off a 15-year mortgage in 7.5 years, avoided debt altogether (except for the mortgage), fully contribute to my IRA every year and save as much as possible, even though I have never earned more than $55K per year. However, I'll admit that I'm not as good a saver as was my mother (who managed all the household finances). I don't clip coupons anymore (too hard to keep track of them AND too time-consuming) and I'm also a smoker. And when I was young I spent more than I should have on foreign travel. But at least I rarely buy anything that isn't on sale, or I'll get the store brand, and when I make the major expenditure of a car, I buy a recent-year, low-mileage used car (preferably pre-certified) that still has a few years left to its warranty. By the way, you can save much on groceries by shopping at Aldi (if there's one nearby).
3
WilWil242 posts since
Feb 26, 2010
Rep Points: 1,281
5. Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 8:11 AM
Wil:  Bravo to your mom for raising a son who follows in her footsteps!  She did her job fantastically.  I do sound like I could be a duplicate for her but I think we have thousands of moms who handle their finances this way.  But we all don't get to have our kids follow our role model.  Don't sweat the foreign travel.  I always set aside two trips every year for us no matter how I had to penny pinch.  Our trips to Switzerland were a dream come true and the memories get me through the hard times now.  We have an Aldi here but it is not nearby so I find other stores.  Your post was a joy to my heart and I know your mom, wherever in Heaven she is, must be so proud of you!  Keep making her smile!

Thanks for starting my day with such a joyful post!
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paoli2paoli21,140 posts since
Aug 10, 2011
Rep Points: 5,087
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