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Credit Card Data Protection

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 10:47 AM
From Bankrate.com:

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/c...data-1.asp

Common-sense risk reduction measures that worth repeating:

"1. Set up mobile alerts for your phone if your financial institution provides the feature. That way, you can be aware of unusual activity as quickly as possible.

2. Regularly monitor your accounts online, so you can identify fraudulent transactions faster, says Schultz.

3. Avoid public computers. Don't log onto your email if your bank corresponds with you there. Urban suggests setting up an email account just for your finances and checking it from safe locations.

4. Avoid doing business with unfamiliar online vendors, Noonan says. Stick to established merchants and websites.

5. If your information has been compromised, notify your financial institutions and local law enforcement, which will contact the Secret Service if necessary. Also notify any of the three major credit reporting agencies -- Experian, Equifax and TransUnion -- to set up a fraud alert on your credit reports."

Additions:

6. Go to familiar restaurants only, follow path of credit card from waitress' hand and back.

7. Go to familiar gas stations only and examine and card insertion slot closely.

8. Go to familiar ATMs only and examine the card insertion slot closely.

9. Change all passwords monthly.

10. Subscribe to a credit card monitoring service that offers instant alert for account changes.

11. Etc., etc., etc.

 

 
4
51hh51hh1,462 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 6,352
1. Monday, March 4, 2013 - 5:44 PM
Regarding number 5, I can assure you your local police will not contact the Secret Service or anyone else for that matter. They will take your police report and wish you a good day. Number 6 is a worthy endeavor but totally unrealistic.
2
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
2. Monday, March 4, 2013 - 7:22 PM
Regarding number 5, I can assure you your local police will not contact the Secret Service or anyone else for that matter. They will take your police report and wish you a good day. Number 6 is a worthy endeavor but totally unrealistic.

Ok, but since there is a genuine risk for such visits (that the card is out of sight for a certain length of time), one can either track the card or approach the front desk to pay the bill.  What else whould you suggest?

2
51hh51hh1,462 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 6,352
3. Monday, March 4, 2013 - 7:57 PM
I suppose approaching the front desk to pay the bill would be the safest way to protect your credit card information. In many restaurants if you give the credit card to the waitress, it is impossible to watch her the entire time, particularly if your table is not in the same room with the front desk. At least they can't steal your SS# with just your credit card.
2
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
4. Tuesday, March 5, 2013 - 6:47 AM
I suppose approaching the front desk to pay the bill would be the safest way to protect your credit card information. In many restaurants if you give the credit card to the waitress, it is impossible to watch her the entire time, particularly if your table is not in the same room with the front desk. At least they can't steal your SS# with just your credit card.

That was my initial pointy, we are in agreement.  "Caution" and "alert" are the key.

4
51hh51hh1,462 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 6,352
5. Saturday, March 23, 2013 - 3:54 AM
hi,

 these are very helpful  but I also want to share some more point to keep data safe in our credit card like

1.With credit card holders are  credit cards secure at one place.

2.The credit card holder makes it convenient to for all men to carry credit cards in a small valet bag.

3.The possibility of damage from carrying it into hip pocket was always there.

4.Since credit card holders  now go into a bag, the possibility of getting lost into the bag is obviated by using a credit card holder.

if we follow these techniques,we can easily protect data.
1
aaronedwardaaronedward1 posts since
Mar 22, 2013
Rep Points: 1
6. Friday, April 19, 2013 - 1:36 AM
Thieves do go through mailboxes and garbage bins, so you might want to put a lock on them and shred documents that you throw in the trash. Never let your card out of sight when you use it to pay for purchases, do not use them in ATM machines that are situated in poorly crowded and shady places, never use them in small establishments and never talk to anyone posing as bank representatives over the phone or on the internet. Another credit card data protection tip is to do a credit check regularly. If you are too busy, you can apply for a credit monitoring service that will instantly alert you of any changes in your credit score. In this way, if the transaction isn’t made by you, you are given the chance to prevent the thief from damaging your score and stealing your money.
2
joymalijoymali16 posts since
Apr 6, 2013
Rep Points: 23
7. Friday, May 24, 2013 - 5:32 AM
Going to familiar places only is not really possible. Of course, there are times when people need to go someplace else or purchase items from a store which solely sells those products, so using credit cards in only the places people are familiar with are not possible. The best thing to do is to simply follow your card whenever you use them in familiar or unfamiliar places. As sometimes it is not because of the place but because of the people whose hands are on your card who have ill intentions. Another thing, checking your credit score regularly is indeed a risk reduction measure worth repeating. Be familiar with your score, so that if it drops and you are sure that it isn’t because of your financial practices, you can immediately take the necessary measures needed to protect not only your score but your overall financial health.
1
amyjk5amyjk520 posts since
Mar 29, 2013
Rep Points: 25
8. Friday, May 24, 2013 - 7:10 AM
A good idea would be to have the system that I experiened in Canada. The waitperson brings a hand-held card reader to you table, swipes the card in front of you and hands you the machine to finishe the process.
5
ANNON7887ANNON78871 posts since
May 24, 2013
Rep Points: 5
9. Friday, July 12, 2013 - 12:27 PM
From Bankrate.com:

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/c...data-1.asp

Common-sense risk reduction measures that worth repeating:

"1. Set up mobile alerts for your phone if your financial institution provides the feature. That way, you can be aware of unusual activity as quickly as possible.

2. Regularly monitor your accounts online, so you can identify fraudulent transactions faster, says Schultz.

3. Avoid public computers. Don't log onto your email if your bank corresponds with you there. Urban suggests setting up an email account just for your finances and checking it from safe locations.

4. Avoid doing business with unfamiliar online vendors, Noonan says. Stick to established merchants and websites.

5. If your information has been compromised, notify your financial institutions and local law enforcement, which will contact the Secret Service if necessary. Also notify any of the three major credit reporting agencies -- Experian, Equifax and TransUnion -- to set up a fraud alert on your credit reports."

Additions:

6. Go to familiar restaurants only, follow path of credit card from waitress' hand and back.

7. Go to familiar gas stations only and examine and card insertion slot closely.

8. Go to familiar ATMs only and examine the card insertion slot closely.

9. Change all passwords monthly.

10. Subscribe to a credit card monitoring service that offers instant alert for account changes.

11. Etc., etc., etc.

 

 Identity theft occurs when someone obtains your personal information, such as your credit card data or Social Security number, to commit fraud or other crimes. The Federal Trade Commission estimates that 9 million Americans suffer identity theft annually. It sounds like a big number, but it isn’t.
2
thomaseric228thomaseric22813 posts since
Apr 2, 2013
Rep Points: 16
10. Saturday, July 13, 2013 - 2:10 PM
Sorry, TE, what was the point you were making?  Identity Theft is not an issue or it is an important issue?
2
51hh51hh1,462 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 6,352
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