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21% Of Internet Users Have Had Banking Accounts Compromised

Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 8:20 AM
3
Ally6770Ally6770909 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,643
1. Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 8:34 AM
This means that https is no longer safe. 
3
Ally6770Ally6770909 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,643
2. Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 2:37 PM
A relative recently informed me that her bank changed her account number and debit card number because they noticed a large payment on the account which wasn't usual for her.  This seems odd to me that they would change things for a payment??  What kind of a hacker would make "payments" from someone else's bank account?  Her credit card company also sent her a new credit card number at her renewal date for the card.  I have never gotten a new cc number upon renewal date.  It seems all kinds of changes are being enacted due to these ID and hacker problems nowadays.  (BTW, the large payment was a legitimate one from her.)
4
paoli2paoli21,367 posts since
Aug 10, 2011
Rep Points: 5,993
3. Saturday, April 19, 2014 - 8:13 PM
Unless a financial institution is negligent and compromises their customers information it is the responsibility of each consumer to insure that their accounts are secure through common sense precautions. Make sure one changes their passwords on a regular basis, have a firewall installed and active, and update anti-virus/malware software on a regular basis. Utilize credit card virtual numbers, such as available through Citibank, when available.
5
ShorebreakShorebreak2,604 posts since
Apr 6, 2010
Rep Points: 14,109
4. Monday, April 21, 2014 - 10:40 AM
This means that https is no longer safe. 
Actually, the article did not even mention https. It was about any and all data breaches of any kind, even swiping credit cards at a store, as well as reckless consumers on the Internet -- who knows what cyber-criminal Websites they let themselves be lured into giving their information.
2
me1004me1004370 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,568
5. Monday, April 21, 2014 - 11:05 AM
Sorry it must have been another article that I read that stated this. Maybe it meant that https gave you a false security promise. 

I have also went back looking for an article that I read Saturday that stated that this flaw has been present in programs since the 90's. I have not seen that before. All other article that I have read said it has been out there for only a couple of years. If I run into it again I will post that. 

Edit--This was the sentence used---It pretty much means that if you put a credit card number into a secure website (that uses https://) then that info might have found its way into the hands of hackers. 
1
Ally6770Ally6770909 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,643
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