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AARP Visa Card From Chase - 5% Cash Back For 6 Months

Monday, February 7, 2011 - 7:36 PM
AARP Visa Card from Chase:

promotion link

* 5% cash back on all purchases for 6 months
* No annual fee
* 0% intro APR for 12 months on purchases and balance transfers

You must be an AARP Member to apply for the AARP Platinum Visa card.

Some of the offer details:
Earn Unlimited Cash Back

Rewards are earned as points, which can be redeemed for cash back. 1% cash back equals 1 point. If you choose to redeem for cash back, 1 point equals $0.01 cash back. For example, 2,500 points can be redeemed for a $25 check.

For the first 6 billing cycles from your enrollment date in the program, you will earn 4 bonus points in addition to your 1 base point (total 5 points) for each $1 of net purchases.

Credit for this find goes to Hustler Money Blog
5
Ken TuminKen Tumin5,442 posts since
Nov 29, 2009
Rep Points: 123,743
1. Thursday, February 17, 2011 - 6:20 PM
I remember a few years ago, people under 50 could join AARP as an associate member. However, I couldn't find these details on their website. So I sent an email asking about this. Here is an excerpt of the reply I received:
Membership is available to anyone 50 years of age or older, whether retired or working.  However, for those under the age of 50 who support our goals and objectives, we offer an associate membership. Associate members are issued a membership ID number, but do not receive a membership card until their 50th birthday, when they become eligible for all AARP benefits and services.   

One membership fee includes a secondary membership for another adult living in your home.  Current dues are $16.00 for one year

1
Ken TuminKen Tumin5,442 posts since
Nov 29, 2009
Rep Points: 123,743
2. Friday, March 4, 2011 - 6:49 AM
At one time you could buy a lifetime membership. I think we paid $50 for the lifetime membership in 1991.
2
AllyAlly785 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,281
3. Friday, March 4, 2011 - 5:27 PM
This is a self-serving organization that makes humongous profits from affiliating with insurance companies and banks by pushing these non-competitive products on their members. They also take political positions and support politicians (Democratic Party) that are in favor of policy positions (low savings rates) not in the interest of their members.
5
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
4. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 12:47 PM
I agree that AARP makes most of their profit from insurance products. They supported Part D. This was bad for many of their  members who were democrats who mostly already had much better prescription coverage. This was a republican plan. Mr. Novelli was not for the democrats. They lost several million members after part D was passed. If we had not already had a  lifetime membership we would have also ripped up our membership. AARP had to raise more money and they lowered the age to join. Mr. Novelli left.  I would not give one more penny to them, but I do enjoy their newspaper and I read the information on what their lawyers are fighting for in the advocacy newsletter and also am taking advantage of this credit card. We are building a new home, buying new appliances, furniture and a new car, and even if we were not I would be charging my phone bill, electric bill, food and gas for 6 months and  pay it off each month to make the 5% cash back.
2
AllyAlly785 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 2,281
5. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 8:34 PM
This is much more complex than you are describing, lou.  If you do business with any bank or organization, chances are that they will support causes that you don't approve of, perhaps even detest.  Almost any organization that lobbies gives money to both parties.

I tend to base my financial decisions on the most lucrative deals for my family and me and keep the politics out of it.  I imagine I wouldn't do business with any organization that did truly heinous things, like supporting genocide or terrorists, but I don't count the AARP as one of those organizations.

I joined AARP for $16, received the Chase AARP card, am taking advantage of the 5% unlimited cash back for 6 months -- travel is actually 7%, and am not going to let any political differences get in the way of that.

You'll probably get much support for your statement, but I prefer rosie43's approach.
2
glxpassglxpass38 posts since
May 2, 2010
Rep Points: 240
6. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 9:36 PM
I don't want to get too political here, but I do not like the positions this organization takes on public policy matters and, therefore, choose not to support them financially. I don't have a problem if other people patronize them, that's the free market at work. However, they have a history of demagoguing social secuity and medicare, making it harder to reform these programs so our country doesn't implode financially. They also supported Obamacare, which I believe will irreparably harm our health care system. In additon, for some odd reason they have taken positons opposing any reform of our public educational system. Of course, they have a business relationship with the teacher's unions, so to curry favor with them they have become part of the anti-reform efforts financed by the unions.  Sorry for the political rant, but thought I owed an explanation for my dislike of this organiztion. By the way, Robert Samuelson, a respected economist, also criticizes them for their political positions.
1
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
7. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 9:50 PM
One other thing that irritates me is that they are suppose to advocate on behalf of senior citizens, but I have not heard a peep out of them regarding the zero interest rate policy supported by our present govt. Why not, they feel compelled to take positions on everything else. However, the one policy that does more to hurt senior citizens than anything else, and they are strangely silent.
1
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
8. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 10:53 PM
Please don't use DepositAccounts.com as a forum for your political platform or ranting, whether you think it's justified or not.  If my previous post somehow encouraged your subsequent two posts, please just ignore it.  Thanks.

In response to the below post, where you say you don't use this forum to express your political views, that seems inconsistent with you previously apologizing for your political rant:
Sorry for the political rant

 


Can we return to the topic at hand?

See http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/1072125/ for a detailed discussion of the Chase AARP card.
2
glxpassglxpass38 posts since
May 2, 2010
Rep Points: 240
9. Sunday, March 6, 2011 - 11:16 PM
Listen, I don't use this forum to express my political views, however I felt that I needed to respond to your post which implied that this organization contributes money to both parties, and they are doing what everyone else does. I didn't want to leave this inaccurate impression unanswered. As requested, I will ignore your posts henceforth.

 For your information, there has been significant political discussion on this forum criticizing Fed monetary policy and other policies antithetical to savers
4
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
10. Monday, March 7, 2011 - 2:06 AM
Glxpass, I read that entire thread at FatWallet and can see that one can make a lot of money using this promotion. I have no objection to that at all. I see you are spending over $30,000 a month and am wondering how you are able to do that. Are these real purchases to third parties or what you guys refer to as churning, where you are able recoup the money. I wouldn't mind taking advantage of this promotion (AARP is certainly not benefiting), but there is no way I can spend that much money each month unless it is somehow paid to yourself.
1
loulou521 posts since
Aug 3, 2010
Rep Points: 3,239
11. Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 7:00 AM
A reader emailed me about how she gets around the small credit limit on this card:
They would not give real large lines of credit but you can pay by phone and when the debit clears your bank you can call and they will verify and reset your limit.

1
Ken TuminKen Tumin5,442 posts since
Nov 29, 2009
Rep Points: 123,743
12. Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 7:48 AM
There are people (e.g., a frequent poster  at FWF I would not name), who are clueless and non-prudent, that will eventually ruin the deal for all of us.
3
51hh51hh1,462 posts since
Jan 16, 2010
Rep Points: 6,352
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