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Savings Account and CD Rate Hikes at Alliant Credit Union

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Alliant Credit Union increased rates on its savings account and certificates. The savings account rate increased 10 basis points to 0.90% APY. Alliant’s savings account rate had been a little low for the last two years. It’s nice to see this rate increase that brings Alliant’s rate close to the top savings account rates at internet banks.

Alliant’s certificate rates also increased in February. The CD rates increased from 5 to 20 basis points, with Alliant’s Jumbo certificates having the largest rate increases. Alliant has brought back premium rates for its Jumbo CDs. These require a minimum deposit of $25,000. The highest rate is now 2.15% APY for a term of 48 to 60 months. This requires a $25,000 minimum deposit. For a minimum deposit of $1,000, the rate has remained the same at 2.10% APY. The largest rate jump occurred on Alliant’s short-term CDs with terms from 12 to 17 months. The rate increased 10 basis points to 1.00% APY for a $1,000 minimum deposit, and the rate increased 20 basis points to 1.10% APY for a $25,000 minimum. The early withdrawal penalty is still only 180 days of dividends for CDs with terms of 2 years and longer. No partial withdrawals are allowed. Please refer to this Alliant certificates page for more details on rates and early withdrawal penalties.

Thanks to Pearlbrown who first mentioned the rate hikes in the DA forum.

APYMINMAXINSTITUTIONPRODUCTDETAILS
1.15%$1k$25kAlliant Credit Union12 - 17 Month Share CD
1.00%--Alliant Credit UnionSavings
Accounts mentioned in this post. Rates as of December 2, 2016.

Alliant Credit Union had very competitive savings account rates for several years before 2010. During that time the rate was close to the leading savings account rates at internet banks. Things changed at Alliant a few years ago. The savings account rate went down more than it did at several internet banks. I did a chart showing Alliant’s rate and the savings account rate at Capital One 360 (formerly ING Direct) since 2011. In recent times, Capital One 360 has never been a rate leader, but it has kept its savings account rate reasonably competitive. Thus, it’s useful to use it as a benchmark to compare others. As you can see below, Alliant’s savings account had higher rates than Capital One 360 before 2013, but in early 2013, Alliant’s rate fell to 0.70%, and it remained at this low rate until October of last year. Capital One’s rate bottomed at 0.75%, and it has remained at this level since October 2012.

Alliant Credit Union vs Capital One 360

Even though Alliant Credit Union’s savings account rate has been a little low in the last few years, many DA readers have remained with Alliant due to non-rate reasons such as a great ACH bank-to-bank transfer system and superb customer service. The ACH transfers initiated through Alliant are fast (typically taking only one business day), and Alliant’s ACH dollar limits are reasonably large ($100K per day for those who have been members for at least 30 days). You can also set up an unlimited number of links to your accounts at other banks or credit unions.

ATM News

Alliant Credit Union also has a nice interest checking account that you may want to use as your primary checking account. It’s a free checking account with a high rate option, and its features continue to improve. The latest enhancement is ATM fee refunds. Alliant will now reimburse their checking account holders up to $20 per month in ATM fees. For more details about Alliant’s checking account and its ATM policy, please refer to Alliant’s free checking page.

Membership and Opening Accounts

There two easy ways to qualify for Alliant membership. First is through the PTA (either national or local). Second is through the Foster Care to Success (FCS) organization. According to Alliant's Foster Care to Success page:

Members of FCS are eligible to join Alliant Credit Union [...] By making a $10 or greater donation to the Foster Care to Success (FCS), you will become a member of FCS, receive literature and other information from FCS, and qualify to join Alliant.

For the full details on membership, please refer to Alliant's membership page. Those who live or work in parts of Chicagoland can be immediately eligible to join.

You can join Alliant online. Also, most accounts can be opened online and funded with an ACH transfer from your existing bank.

Alliant Credit Union Overview

Alliant Credit Union used to be United Airlines Employees’ Credit Union. That's why many of their branches are located in airports.

In addition to Chicago, Alliant Credit Union branches are located in the metro areas of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, Denver, Houston, Washington DC and Newark. Note, some of these branches are located inside airports and are not publicly accessible.

One downside with Alliant is that it's not part of any shared branch network.

With $8.09 billion in assets, Alliant Credit Union is one of the top ten largest credit unions in the nation. It has an overall health grade at DepositAccounts.com of an "A" with a Texas Ratio of 3.17% (excellent) based on September 30, 2014 data. Please refer to our financial overview of Alliant Credit Union for more details. The credit union is federally insured by the NCUA (Charter # 67955).

Related Pages: Alliant Credit Union, Washington, Chicago, Houston, Denver, Los Angeles, San Francisco Bay, CD rates, savings account

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Comments
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #1
Alliant is the best credit union in America.  And while higher interest rates at Alliant are a good thing, Alliant is the best not because of its interest rates, but instead because of its superior stable of offerings and services.
OldGuy
OldGuy   |     |   Comment #2
I second that sentiment.
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #3
Alliant is so good, I have wondered from time to time what might happen to bring them down.  This is a little bit like things are with the USA itself:  the kill shot will come from within.  Thus, with Alliant, it will not be external competition that takes them down and makes them a less attractive financial institution.  The Alliant kill shot will be fired by somebody high in the ranks of Alliant potentates.  Indeed, anyone who reads Ken's blog already has witnessed evidence of this sort of thing with the Ally Bank "improved" website debacle.  Ally violated the cardinal rule:

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"

I think this same sort of catastrophe could ensue at Alliant, destroying the credit union's superior, and pivotal, prime customer interface, all in the name of making "improvements"!  Why would some jackass at Alliant destroy a website already so superbly well designed?  I dunno.  But regrettably, such things happen all the time.     

  
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #4
If you don't like the website, then why do you still do business with them?
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #6
What could kill Alliant? Well, Wells Fargo could buy it out...
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #5
Alliant is fantastic. High rates, low (or no) fees, 24hr customer service, easy online access, free credit score reporting, an ATM-only card for those who don't like debit cards (as well as debit cards for those who do), no ridiculous low ACH limits (unlimited), and treats their customers right. After finally leaving NavyFed (which I couldn't stand for their ineptitude, bad customer service and terrible policies) I've been a happy customer at Alliants. Night and day different. The rates are just icing on the cake (though a very NICE icing -- currently about double what NavyFed is paying, with better service, better policies, better treatment, fast immediate account updates, everything you could want).
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #7
I've been an Alliant customer for a long time.  I generally love their site and the features it offers.  The biggest issue I have is joint accounts.  I have joint accounts with my wife.  The only way she could see the accounts was to separately join Alliant and get her own member number.  Then I had to "share" all the joint accounts over to her member number.

Even so, she still can't see bill pay history, transfer history, etc on her login for the things I do on our joint accounts.  Generally it isn't a big deal, but from time to time it would be useful if she could just login and pay a bill or check something.  She can't.

Alliant's only solution.  She has to open her own checking account, then when she needs to pay a bill, transfer money from "my" checking account to "her" checking account, add the payee to her account and then pay the bill.  Of course when she does that, I can't see the payment history just as she can't see the payment history when I make a payment.

Generally their site is great, easy to use and trouble free.  But this is kind of a pain and something they should of addressed a long time ago.  I've used a lot of banking sites and I've never seen this kind of setup.
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #11
So what do most couples do who are in this situation of wanting a truly joint account?
Do they instead just share the same login account credentials?  Is that fine?  
paoli2
paoli2   |     |   Comment #13
This isn't just Alliant that has such stupid rules for "couples" and accounts.  Our brokerages "insist" I must only login with my own SS number and different password etc or I am "not" allowed to even look at my partner's accounts on line even tho I am the Responsible Party on the accounts and do all the business for the accounts.  I asked them how do they know who is sitting at the computer if I just login with his login and look at them and they say it "can't" be done!  I asked them to tell me when they put video cameras in our apartment because how else would they know who is actually sitting at the computer!  Sooo  I ended up doing it their way and using a new login so I could "see" his account.  Blows my mine as to what difference it makes but somebody must have come up with this idea years ago.  None of our credit unions or banks have made a big deal about "peeking" into our apt. and seeing who is actually typing in the info thank goodness!
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #14
Schwab brokerage lets you look at different owner accounts (both bank and brokerage accounts) on one login.
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #15
Although the one thing I don't like about Schwab is the antiquated methods of opening joint accounts.  One of the only places I know of requiring slow paper-based forms and snail-mail to open a joint account.  It's a turn-off for me.  
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #12
According to Alliant CU when I spoke to them, it appears that this is no longer an issue.  Maybe because of the online site revamp in 2015?  

So said that based on the scenario as described above with couples having their own online login accounts and say 2 joint checking accounts that both users will have equal access to the 2 checking accounts to transact on.  That's what they told me but would love to hear recent anecdotal experiences.  
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #8
I have enjoyed everything about my Alliant checking account -- except their Bill Pay. 

Instead of paying a bill and debiting my account when the money goes into the payee's account ... like every other Bill Pay I have used ... Alliant recommends that I schedule my payment "a minimum of 5 to 7 business days in advance of the due date" ... which is when it comes out of my account.

So I lose a week of interest on every Bill Pay amount ... and Alliant gets it.  Thus their Bill Pay is definitely not free.

Sadly, I'm beginning to shop for a new bank.



So I lose a week's interest
paoli2
paoli2   |     |   Comment #9
A week of what rate?  .11%??  Is what you lose that much?  To each his own.
Anonymous
Anonymous   |     |   Comment #10
Please reconsider your analysis.  I'm a long time Alliant member.  I schedule all of my bill payments in advance, not because they require it but because doing things that way is more convenient for me.  The money is never debited from my Alliant checking until the evening of the day I designate the bill is to be paid, and I lose no interest whatsoever because I advance schedule.  Please trust me on this.  I know whereof I speak.