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Best Budgeting Or Longterm Forecasting Or Retirement Software Or Site?

John Sears
John Sears   |     |   55 posts since 2015

Seems there's nothing that will take into account changes over a 30 year period, such as rising rent, dipping into the principal, etc.  Mint doesn't seem to address this, don't think YNAB does either..

Have you found anything that works?



Answers
klink
klink   |     |   157 posts since 2012
Hi John, I haven't looked at those you mentioned. I just used excell and came up with a yearly forecast based upon knowns (Mtg, Home and Auto ins. etc.). I took my known income and budgeted it out for say 2016 to cover all my known expenses to include emergency funds, savings and an increase in taxes from CD proceeds. Then I have to pay alot of attention to state and local news and newspapers for possible increases in property taxes, vehicle taxes, fees associated with owning vehicles. I take the proposed increases usually by percentage and then adjust my monthly planning figures accordingly. It works for me and it might give you some ideas. Good luck.
John Sears
John Sears   |     |   55 posts since 2015
klink, thanks for responding.  I took a course at the library and found Excel impossible to fathom, as well as some courses on Youtube.  Maybe it's time to try it again. 
klink
klink   |     |   157 posts since 2012
John, it can be intimidating. I recommend depending on which excel you have going to (Barnes and Noble) and getting Visuals "Teach Yourself Visually" Microsoft Office Excel. In my case I got Excel 2007. It's taken me numerous times to get things set up but it works. I might recommend cutting your forecast time down to something more manageable (ie: 12mos. vs longer term). To many changes over a longer term to have to go back and re-calculate everything.
John Sears
John Sears   |     |   55 posts since 2015
Thank you.  The biggest stumbling block is the Inherited Traditional IRA my Dad left me.  I get $5K available each year as RMD which has to be withdrawn.  However, it's not really income like Social Security.  However, it only dips down $3K because of roughly $2K interest which has to go back into the IRA and can't be withdrawn.  This has made the whole thing unbelievably complicated.
John Sears
John Sears   |     |   55 posts since 2015
Financial guru Jonathan Clements answered me on Facebook and has alerted me today to what look like some fascinating Financial Calculators including retirement:  http://www.dinkytown.net/java/RetirementPlan.html