Quorum Federal Credit Union 30-Month CD APY Breaks 4%

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Deal Summary: Term Savings CDs – 30-month, 4.00% APY ($1k min), 4.10% APY ($100k min); 13-month, 3.50% APY ($1k min) 3.60% APY ($100k min); new money.

Availability: Easy membership requirement

I think this is the first time I’ve seen a credit union generate a hashtag to promote CDs.

We #CantStopWontStop Raising Our Savings Rates

It’s only been two weeks since New York-based Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) added 50 bps to both the 13-month and 30-month Term Savings CDs (TSCD). Apparently, Quorum is serious about #CantStopWontStop: another 50 bps have been added, with the 13-month TSCF and 30-month TSCD now offering APYs of 3.50%/3.60% and 4.00%/4.10%, respectively. While the higher rate tier is not listed on the Quorum Rates page, the fine print states,

Term Account deposits of $100,000 or more earn an additional 0.10% APY.

New money is required, which is defined as “funds from an external source or funds that have been on deposit with Quorum for two weeks or less.” While deposits made in conjunction with a new Quorum membership cannot exceed $250k, additional TSCDs with a larger deposit can be opened once a membership is established.

The TSCDs are also available as IRA TSCDs (Traditional and Roth), earning the same APYs with the same deposit requirements.

24-Month Term Savings CD

The 24-month TSCD also gained 50 bps and currently earns 3.60% APY. Unlike the 13-month and 30-month TSCDs, the 24-month TSCD does not require new money, but is eligible for the extra 10 bps with a deposit of $100k or more.

As stated on Quorum's Fees Schedule page, the Early Withdrawal Penalty (EWP) reads as follows:

12-24 month Term Accounts - 2% of amount withdrawn
never to exceed original principal balance.

25 month+ Term Accounts - 3% of amount withdrawn
never to exceed original principal balance.

I wrote about the 13-month and 30-month TSCDs in January 2022 when the rates were 0.90% APY and 1.10% APY, respectively. At that time, I called the EWP harsh. I thought the EWPs had possibly been reduced since the landing page states, “Super low early withdrawal penalties.” The EWPs have remained the same, but the higher TSCD rates do make them less harsh. For example, 3% of the amount withdrawn would equal approximately 9 months of interest for the 30-month CD with a $100k deposit. This EWP is on the high side for a mid-term CD.

I'm not sure what is meant by the wording "never to exceed original principal balance." Without looking at this carefully, I had thought it would exclude the penalty from eating into the principal. As readers mentioned in the comments, this wording does not exclude the possibility. Perhaps the credit union meant to say "never to reduce original principal balance." As it is written, there is a risk that the penalty could eat into the principal if a withdrawal is made early into the term.

Dividends are compounded and credited monthly, and can be transferred to a Quorum savings account without penalty.

Funding any Quorum account can be done by ACH, through an external transfer, or through a Shared Branch transaction, all of which are described in detail in Quorum’s FAQs.

Maturing funds can be distributed by check to the address on file or transferred to a Quorum savings account. There is a seven calendar day grace period (beginning on the maturity date) before a TSCD automatically renews. (The 13-month TSCD renews as a 12-month TSCD and a 30-month TSCD renews as a 36-month TSCD.) Quorum will send a notification at least 30 days before the maturity date.

Unlimited beneficiaries can be designated with percentages assigned. Social Social numbers, DOB, and physical address must be provided for each name beneficiary.

Regarding a hard pull in the application process, Quorum specifically states in this FAQ, that no hard pull is done. Only a soft pull is done:

When Quorum reviews a checking or savings account application, we may perform a soft pull on an applicant’s credit report through one of the three major credit reporting agencies (TransUnion, Experian, Equifax) for verification purposes, and also run the name through ChexSystems to see if there is a report in their system. Neither of these actions will impact an applicant's credit score in any way.

Availability

Headquartered in Purchase (Westchester County), New York, Quorum Federal Credit Union’s field of membership (FOM) is open to employees, retirees, and associates of more than 65 select companies and affiliates (SEGs), including Kraft Heinz Company, Mastercard, and Avon. A complete list of these SEGs can be found on the Membership Eligibility page.

Family members of an employee/retiree of any of the SEGs are also eligible to join Quorum. “Family members” are defined as parent/stepparent, child/stepchild, sibling/stepsibling, grandparent/grandchild, spouse/domestic partner, and housemate.

Easy Membership - If you are not associated with any of the 65+ groups, you can qualify by joining the Select Savers Club ($5 lifetime fee paid by Quorum) or the American Consumer Council. According to CSR, the "I would like to join through the following association" option (located in the Eligibility section of Quorum’s online application) allows the applicant to join either association and Quorum simultaneously.

While previously having branch locations in Illinois, New Jersey, and New York, Quorum now describes itself as “an online credit union.” Joining Quorum and/or opening a 13-month or 30-month TSCD can only be done online.

Use our easy, online application to become a Quorum member and open an account with us. During the application process, you can choose to open any savings product(s) you like.

The online application takes less than 5 minutes to complete! Once you submit your application, it may take between 24-48 hours to establish your account.

Current members can open a new TSCD using Quorum’s online banking platform.

Click on “Open Savings and Checking Accounts” in the main menu. Select the product(s) you wish to open, the follow the prompts to complete the application. Once you submit your application, the status will be presented on the screen.

Establishing a Quorum membership requires a $5 minimum deposit in a Basic Savings account, which is opened automatically and funded by Quorum when your application is approved.

Quorum participates in both the CO-OP Shared Branch network and the ATM network.

We participate in Shared Branching and ATM networking to allow you hands-on, in-person access to your Quorum accounts. View our nationwide network of over 90,000+ FREE ATMs and 5,000 Shared Service Centers.

Credit Union Overview

Quorum Federal Credit Union has an overall health grade of "B+" at DepositAccounts.com, with a Texas Ratio of 15.55% (above average) based on June 30, 2022 data. In the past year, Quorum increased its total non-brokered deposits by $60.99 million, an excellent annual growth rate of 7.03%. Please refer to our financial overview of Quorum Federal Credit Union (NCUA Charter # 22769) for more details.

Founded in 1934 as the Kraft Foods Federal Credit Union, Quorum Federal Credit Union has grown to be New York State’s 22nd largest credit union, with more than 67,000 members and assets in excess of $1.1 billion. According to a March 2022 CUTimes.com article, Quorum was one of the 10 largest sellers of non-real estate loan participations in 2021.

These 10 credit unions had returns on average assets of 1.51% in 2021, compared with 1.07% for all credit unions.

#7. Quorum Federal Credit Union, Purchase, N.Y. ($1 billion assets, 66,084 members) sold $476.2 million in loans in 2021, up 60% from the $298.5 million in 2020.

How the 30-Month Term Savings CD Compares

When compared to similar length-of-term CDs tracked by DepositAccounts.com that are available nationally, no banks or credit unions have a higher rate than currently offered on the Quorum Federal Credit Union 30-Month Term Savings CD, regardless of minimum deposit requirements. The following table compares the 30-Month Term Savings CD to the two highest-rate CDs from other credit unions and the two highest-rate CDs from banks.

How the 13-month Term Savings CD Compares

When compared to similar length-of-term CDs tracked by DepositAccounts.com that are available nationally, no banks or credit unions have a higher rate than currently offered on the Quorum Federal Credit Union 13-Month Term Savings CD, regardless of minimum deposit requirements. The following table compares the 13-Month Term Savings CD to the two highest-rate CDs from other credit unions and the two highest-rate CDs from banks.

How the 24-Month Term Savings CD Compares

When compared to similar length-of-term CDs tracked by DepositAccounts.com which are available nationwide and have minimum deposit requirements of $10k or less, only one bank has a higher rate than currently offered on the Quorum Federal Credit Union 24-Month Term Savings CD. The following table compares the 24-month Term Savings CD to the two highest-rate CDs from other credit union and the two highest-rate CDs from banks.

The above information and rates are accurate as of 9/24/2022.

To look for the best CD rates, either nationwide or in your state, please refer to our CD Rates Table page.

Related Pages: New York CD rates, 1-year CD rates, 5-year CD rates, IRA CD rates, nationwide deals

Comments
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #1
Finally a financial institution cracks the 4.0% barrier.

Unfortunately, this still trails comparable term Treasuries (24-month at 4.20% and 36-month at 4.22%) as of Fri Sept 23rd. And Treasuries are state income tax free.

I wonder when a FI is going to come in above comparable term Treasuries. Guess they aren't that desperate for additional funds?
sharon907
  |     |   Comment #2
Perhaps it is one difference between a private business that can choose to not lend (banks) and the US Treasury that has to finance political spendthrifts? Especially with the Federal Reserve no longer buying Treasuries.

Also, of course, big banks have trillions in reserves at the Federal Reserve. If they wanted to make loans, they have more than enough. Instead, they are paid well (by middle-class taxpayers) for keeping it there, rather than lending it. (Interest on Reserve Balances).

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/IORB
P_D
  |     |   Comment #5
"Perhaps it is one difference between a private business that can choose to not lend (banks) and the US Treasury that has to finance political spendthrifts?"

You're finally catching on!

The government is collecting more taxes than it ever has in history, yet still never seems to have enough and has to borrow more, more more to feed the political spending beast until the economy is destroyed. No matter how much they tax it will never be enough. It is the insatiable spending habits of government that are the problem, not a need for more taxes. Its just so easy to spend other peoples' money and government has it down to a science.

"The problem is not that people are taxed too little, the problem is that government spends too much." -Ronald Reagan

Welcome to the light.
sharon907
  |     |   Comment #12
And you remain completely ignorant, of the impact of central banks.

Congratulations. Wallow in it.

You are a typical Loud, Proud, Partisan, with minimal intellectual curiosity, as to how the world actually works.
sharon907
  |     |   Comment #3
Though secondary CDs do have to compete with Treasuries, so there are secondary CDs paying a bit more than Treasuries. And, new issue brokered CDs are at least comparable. I think the buyers of Treasuries and secondary CDs are a similar group, that may exclude many people who prefer to open accounts across the country.

Direct CDs do also have a few advantages, in terms of reinvestment, though CDs also have risk, in case a bank is bankrupted and the certificates terminated early.
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #4
All good points sharon907.

For me, brokered CD's have too much hair on them - most are callable and they can be quite challenging to exit early (and at a steep cost) should one find themself in the position of needing to do that.

Treasuries do have the advantage of being state tax free.

Much easier to open than traditional CD's at new banks or CU's. Brokered CD's about as easy to buy as Treasuries, but with the caveats I mentioned above.

For me, unless and until traditional CD yields exceed Treasuries and by a wide margin, I will be sticking with Treasuries.
spentcattle
  |     |   Comment #8
Could you please explain when is CD is called if it has that feature anytime that interest rates drop. I saw a five year 4.75 one at schwab the other day
P_D
  |     |   Comment #9
"Could you please explain when is CD is called if it has that feature anytime that interest rates drop."

There will be a list of dates on which the CD can be called listed in the description of the CD and the price at which it can be called on each of the call dates (almost always par in the case of CDs).
P_D
  |     |   Comment #11
Note that just because interest rates dropped after the CD was issued does not necessarily mean it will be called. The call feature gives the issuer an *option* to call it but not an obligation.
P_D
  |     |   Comment #6
"although CDs also have risk, in case a bank is bankrupted and the certificates terminated early."

And treasuries have the risk that the US government is the only issuer of debt who can legally create new money and devalue your security at will and in addition has a conflict of interest incentive to do so.
sharon907
  |     |   Comment #16
What is your point?

American CDs are paid in dollars. If the dollars used to repay Treasuries become worthless, so are your dollar CDs.

My advice, is to think.

And of course, the Federal Reserve has created trillions of dollars, to buy the 1/3 of US Treasuries it currently owns.

You don't know how money is created - and refuse to learn.
jofr4646
  |     |   Comment #7
Most are looking for 5yr 4%+.
spentcattle
  |     |   Comment #13
So the schwab brokered CD was 4.75 but was callable in october of 2023. Even if its called you get 4.75 for a year right?
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #15
Yes assuming is callable at 100% of par value - which is almost certainly the case.
P_D
  |     |   Comment #21
#13

I know what you’re thinking. Did he fire six shots or only five? Oh no wait, that’s from a Clint Eastwood movie.

You’re thinking hey, 4.75% for one year? How can I go wrong?

The hidden issue with a call is that it increases your risk of not realizing the return you expect over the term of the original CD.

Here is a (possibly) extreme example to make the point.

Suppose you buy a 5 year CD with a coupon rate of 5% that is callable one year from the issue date.

Now…assume a disaster scenario in which the Democrats win the elections this November and keep full control of the federal government and America slips into a deep recession or worse shortly after. Companies lay off tens of millions of workers and they stand in line for handouts of government cheese and the Democrats increase taxes even more to pay for it throwing the economy from a severe recession into a depression. The Fed cuts interest rates to zero or lower to respond to the disaster. On year one of the CD term the bank exercises the call, and you get your money back. Uh oh! Now where do you put it? In a 4 year treasury paying 0.001%? So instead of having bought that 4% 5 year CD with no call option, you end up with an average return of 0.95% per year over that 5 years with no way out without suffering financial Armageddon vis-à-vis your expectation. Bummer!

Now assume another disaster scenario where rates go in the opposite direction. The Democrats win the elections this November and keep full control of the federal government. They continue to implement even more of their inflationary public policies and in fact redouble them after being emboldened by their win and not worried about what the American public thinks anymore like they were before the election. Inflation increases from their current 40 year record high to 25%, an all time socialist third world style record. So what if you had bought the 5 year CD at 5% with the call option? Call an ambulance bro! That call option won’t be exercised and you will be required to either have a slow financial death and hold it until maturity when you will be lucky if you get back pennies on the dollar, or to rip the band-aid off now and sell it for about the price of one last meal as long as it's a burrito on Taco Bell’s value menu (if you can sell it at all). Either way, you will be sleeping on the streets.

SO… the call increases your risk of realizing a lower return over the 5 years than you might get with buying a similar term CD without a call option. The question is always what that call is worth. How much of a premium in rates does the bank have to pay you to induce you to buy the CD with the call. The answer is that it is a guess and you don’t know. But the chances are the bank has a better handle on the guess than you do. So while I understand some of the aversion some here have to buying CDs with a call option, I don’t think you should dismiss them out of hand as some here have. I think that might be a mistake. Yes, they increase return risk over a defined period and so make the CD more speculative. But they are not necessarily losers in every case, the winning case being lower than expected rate volatility in the CD market.  On a technical level it is understood that volatility favors the option holder.  This comment provides an example of why that is the case.
spentcattle
  |     |   Comment #22
Thank you for the information but is it possible to stick to financials without the political soapbox? I imagine the democrats are also responsible for nearly every country in the world raising rates because of inflation in their own economies? That's rhetorical btw not an opportunity for knee jerk conspiratorial hot wind...
P_D
  |     |   Comment #23
Challenges from the left are always assumed to be rhetorical since it is known they fear rebuttal.
spoofeeDotCom
  |     |   Comment #14
Good god... Rates keep going up. How are you all playing this.
PabloSavin
  |     |   Comment #28
I have been buying CD's for the last 39 years. And for the record we bring in enough interest to live on. You have to realize on thing, they will go up and then down quickly. You may not buy at the top but you may 80% of the way there. No so bad. If you hold money for larger rates you may lose real interest during that period. I have been buying some less than a year cd's right now, but also bought a 5 yr 4.35 non callable Friday. Three year CD's scare me because I believe in 3 Years the rates will probably come down and you will have to reinvest in a lower percent CD. Build you ladder 5-7 years out. Hope fully we will see 5% but 4.3 is OK ! Good luck
Shelby
  |     |   Comment #17
For those of us with maturing 3 yr.PSECU accounts things are really looking good going forward.The 5 yr. Treasury or CD yielding close to 5% before year end is coming!
spentcattle
  |     |   Comment #18
I think govt agency 5 year bonds are at 4.97
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #19
Yeah but they are typically callable. Doubt they investment will remain outstanding for more than a year.
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #20
Count me in the group with PSECU CD’s maturing. I’m not as optimistic as you that we will see the 5-year Treasury at 5.0%, but hope you are right. I’ll be plenty happy with 4.0%+ for 5 or 7 years myself.
SmittyInTheCity
  |     |   Comment #24
Man, some of you have nothing better to do then spout political non-sense. Like don't you get tired of typing the same stuff over and over and over again. This site hasn't gotten any better over the years.
Kerry2
  |     |   Comment #26
Some persons are afraid from the truth.
111
  |     |   Comment #32
Or perhaps even afraid of it, for those of us who passed 5th grade English.
Kerry2
  |     |   Comment #27
Last year the US paid $402 Billions in interest alone on the debt, this year the payments are over $1.2 Trillions and next year it will be over $2.5 Trillions in payments. If you can not see where this is going, you do not want to find the truth.
P_D
  |     |   Comment #31
While not popular to talk about in some circles, and largely ignored by most of the media including the financial media, and while I think your numbers are a little off, I think your concern is well placed Kerry2.

And I believe this has the potential to be a major factor in the course of interest rates for savers. 5 and 6% rates have been discussed here, but in context of the projected federal debt service we already have in terms of both dollars and percent of GDP, the question has to be raised about whether or not that level of rates is even sustainable.... Especially in the context of the rapidly accelerating government spending increases taking place at this very moment.

I think this is one of the most frightening aspects of what's going on in the economy now although you rarely if ever hear it discussed no doubt because no one wants to talk about cutting government spending. There are too many people on the take.

”INTEREST COSTS WILL REACH HISTORIC HIGHS WITHIN THE NEXT 10 YEARS

CBO projects that annual interest costs will rise from $399 billion in 2022 to $1.2 trillion in 2032. As a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), those costs would double from 1.6 percent of GDP in 2022 to 3.3 percent in 2032, which would be the highest level ever recorded."

https://www.pgpf.org/blog/2022/05/interest-costs-on-the-national-debt-set-to-reach-historic-highs-in-the-next-decade
PabloSavin
  |     |   Comment #29
I have been buying CD's for the last 39 years. And for the record we bring in enough interest to live on. You have to realize on thing, they will go up and then down quickly. You may not buy at the top but you may 80% of the way there. No so bad. If you hold money for larger rates you may lose real interest during that period. I have been buying some less than a year cd's right now, but also bought a 5 yr 4.35 non callable Friday. Three year CD's scare me because I believe in 3 Years the rates will probably come down and you will have to reinvest in a lower percent CD. Build you ladder 5-7 years out. Hope fully we will see 5% but 4.3 is OK ! Good luck
jimdog
  |     |   Comment #30
I'm now in the camp that rates will HLF. That is go higher, stay higher longer, and go higher faster than thought. The FED made a huge policy error of printing billions and billions of dollars. They now know their error has caused massive inflation that won't come down for years! I actually think we will see 6% CDs within 2 years!
Shelby
  |     |   Comment #33
Pablo...count me in on your way of thinking!
P_D
  |     |   Comment #34
Has to be unsettling though when you're counting on living off the fixed income from a CD that is paying half the inflation rate. And coincidentally an inflation rate that hasn't been this high since before you started buying CDs 39 years ago.
MikeG62
  |     |   Comment #35
This is a temporary phenomenon. If you buy long dated CD's or Treasuries, I personally believe you will enjoy real yields (above inflation) for the majority of your holding period. I would buy Treasuries over CD's, but that doesn't change that view. Inflation is rolling over - just look at the CPI-U for the last few months - it's flat sequentially. Up strongly YOY, but prices flat the last few months. This suggests we've seen peak inflation.

People can wait till next year to see this is likely to be the case, but long before then these above 4.0% yields will be gone.
P_D
  |     |   Comment #38
#35

The high inflation rates that started in the early 1970s under the Carter administration, the last time inflation spiked this high, lasted 10 or 15 years in spite of the most aggressive intervention from the Fed in history.

What is it that you see as different this time that gives you confidence in that conclusion?

I don't disagree that the scenario you describe is one of the possible scenarios, but wonder if you have a rationale for it other than a random guess.

By the way the inflation spike in the early 70s also had a large element of flawed energy policy under the Carter administration similar to the flawed energy policy of the current administration although I think this administration's policies are far worse still.
Mak
  |     |   Comment #36
Siegel said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that the persistently high inflation in 2022 is due in large part to mistakes made by the Fed in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, which caused economic shutdowns around the world and big drops in global markets, and that the Fed’s pivot to fast rate hikes would cause more economic damage.

“Honestly, I think Chairman Powell should offer the American people an apology for such poor monetary policy that he has pursued, and the Fed has pursued, over the past few years,” Siegel said.
Mak
  |     |   Comment #37
However, Siegel said he doesn’t think wages are really driving inflation this time, saying that recent worker raises appear to be “catch-up” rather than impetus.

“It seems to me wrong for Powell to say we’re going to crush wage increases, we’re going to crush the worker, when that is not the cause of the inflation. The cause of the inflation was excessive monetary accommodation for the last two years,” Siegel said.
___________________

It seems that Professor Siegel is blaming the federal reserve and their monetary policy for inflation.... who knew????
Mak
  |     |   Comment #50
TNX was way overbought so this is what you get...for the 5%,6% CD guys, you don't want to see the10 year break much below 3.48% for too long, that much I can tell you....;)
Quorum Federal Credit Union 30-Month CD Rate Is Near The Top
Deal Summary: Term Savings CDs – 30-month, 3.50% APY ($1k min), 3.60% APY ($100k min); 13-month, 3.00% APY ($1k min) 3.10% APY ($100k min); new money.

Availability: Easy membership requirement

It’s been several months since New York-based Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) had a really competitive Term Savings CD (TSCD). That changed this week, when Quorum added 50 bps to both the 13-month and 30-month TSCDs. Earning 3.50% APY ($1k min) or 3.60% APY ($100k min), the 30-month TSCD offers the more competitive rates. While the higher...

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Quorum Federal Credit Union Adds Nationally Available 13-Month CD
Deal Summary: Term Savings Accounts (CDs) – 13-month, 0.90% APY ($1k min), 1.00% APY ($100k min); 30-month, 1.10% APY ($1k min), 1.20% APY ($100k min); new money.

Availability: Easy membership requirement

In August, Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) added a 30-month Term Savings Account (TSA) earning a competitive 1.00% APY, a rate that lasted until it was increased this week by 10 bps. Quorum also introduced a 13-month TSA this week, which earns 0.90% APY. Both TSAs (Quorum’s version of a CD) can be opened with a...

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Quorum Federal Credit Union Adds Nationally Available 30-Month CD
Deal Summary: 30-month Term Savings Account, 1.00% APY ($1k minimum), 1.10% APY ($100k minimum), new money.

Availability: Easy membership requirement

Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) has just debuted a 30-month Term Savings Account (TSA), which earns a competitive 1.00% APY. The 30-month TSA (Quorum’s version of a CD) can be opened with a minimum $1k deposit of new money, which is defined as “funds that have been on deposit with Quorum for two weeks or less.” While deposits made in conjunction with a new Quorum membership cannot exceed...

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Quorum FCU (Easy Membership) 60-Month CD Joins "3 for 5 Club"

UPDATE 3/23/2018: The APY for all deposits is 3.00% APY.

Deal Summary: 60-month Term Savings Account, 3.00% APY ($1k min), 3.10% APY ($100k min).

Availability: Easy membership requirement

Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) became the newest member of the “3 for 5 Club” this week, when it raised the rate on its 60-month Term Savings Account (TSA) to 3.00% APY. The 60-month TSA (Quorum’s version of a CD) can be opened with a $1k minimum deposit. While deposits made in conjunction with a new Quorum membership cannot exceed...

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Quorum FCU (Easy Membership) Ups 11-Month CD
Deal Summary: Term Savings Account – 11-month (2.00% APY) and 25-month (2.25% APY), $1k minimum deposit.

Availability: Easy membership requirement

Last week, Quorum Federal Credit Union (Quorum) raised the rates on its 11-month Term Savings Account (2.00% APY) and 25-month Term Savings Account (2.25% APY) (A Term Savings Account - TSA, a somewhat unfortunate acronym - is Quorum’s version of a CD.) Either TSA can be opened with a minimum $1k deposit. Deposits made in conjunction with a new Quorum membership cannot exceed $250k, but additional...

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